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Empty nest syndrome is a real thing

Empty nest syndrome is a real thing

I recall the weekend my twins left home to go to university. I took one on the Saturday and the other on the Sunday. My partner was also working away that weekend. I returned on the Sunday, to an empty house and for the first time in my life, felt desolate. Luckily...

Empty nest syndrome is a real thing

I recall the weekend my twins left home to go to university. I took one on the Saturday and the other on the Sunday. My partner was also working away that weekend. I returned on the Sunday, to an empty house and for the first time in my life, felt desolate. Luckily for me my lovely neighbour who...

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Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day

Most children in foster care will have likely experienced a feeling of loss or a sense of...

New year new you

New year new you

Ikigai and what it means Just as humans have lusted after objects and money since the dawn of...

The new normal at our foster agency

The new normal at our foster agency

During the Covid-19 lockdown, according to Barnardo’s, we saw, nationwide, a 44% increase in the number of children requiring foster care. The increased pressure on families, because of job losses, worsening mental health and deepening poverty, has resulted in more children facing neglect and abuse. A predicted second wave of Covid-19 sees further increases expected in the numbers of children who will come in to care through no fault of their own. Many people have considering fostering as a potential career change. Allowances paid to foster carers combined with tax benefits are enabling people who have lost their job as a result of the economic downturn, to feel, that by fostering, they could replace their lost earnings. Enquiries have been received, about fostering, from people who have reassessed their lives through lockdown, and realised what they value in life and as a result are now seeing fostering as something worthwhile that can work with their new way of living, or simply as a way to give something back.

Back to school

Back to school

Routine is something many parents strive to offer their children right from the day they come into the world.

Establishing routine and maintaining boundaries for children in their care are areas we support and encourage our foster carers to develop too. When lockdown occurred in March and schools were closed, normality, as far as routine was concerned, ceased for most children and young people. For parents too, the usual routines ceased as mums, dads, and carers, started homeschooling alongside parenting and for a great many all whilst working either from home, or on the frontline too.

What we look for in a foster carer

What we look for in a foster carer

The responsibility for our own health and wellbeing to a certain extent, belongs to us all. However we understand that our culture and ethos influences levels of wellbeing and feeling of being supported. At To the Moon and Back Foster Care, we believe that there are some key factors that can determine whether our foster carers have a positive or a negative relationship with our organisation. These include:

  • The knowledge that we are available and committed to supporting our foster carers at all times.

  • The level of confidence felt by our carers as a result of their knowledge and skills, built as a result of the development we provide, especially in the subject of trauma informed care.

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